Metallic effects from a thermal ink jet ink

US 2014/0170384 A1
Neutral gray reflective ink
Hewlett-Packard Development Company

Judging by the number of patents filed, it appears that the ink jet printing of expanded colours and appearances are sought after for home and office decorative printing. Reflective inks, in particular, have been disclosed with a particular emphasis on metal flakes – materials currently used in more traditional metal-effect printing processes. Thermal printheads have significant constraints regarding viscosity and particle size and so large metal flakes are a non-starter and a silver nano-particle approach would be expensive and questionable from a toxicological perspective.

The patent suggests that to look metallic, then only a certain threshold value for specular reflection needs to be achieved. It is suggested that 10% of the incident light must be specularly reflected, but greater than this is always desirable. With this specular reflectivity requirement relaxed, alternative non-metallic materials can be considered, such as magnetite. Magnetite (Fe3O4) can be made up into a stable nano-dispersion, suitable for thermal ink jet, and will give a metallic lustre when printed on glossy paper.

However, magnetite has an inherent yellow-orange hue and so to achieve a neutral silver effect a mixture of blue, cyan or magenta dyes must be added to counteract this. The exemplified ink jet formulations first prepared the magnetite dispersion in water by heavily bead milling a 5.6 wt% mixture of the oxide in water with a polyether alkoxysilane reactive dispersant at 0.5 wt%, relative to the pigment. This was then used (at 36.3 wt%) to make a simple thermal ink jet ink with 14 wt% humectant, 0.1 wt% neutralised styrene acrylic binder, 0.3 wt% surfactants, 5.4 wt% of a cyan and magenta dye mixture and water.

June-14aThis ink was loaded into a HP black cartridge from a Photosmart 8450 printer to print colour test patches. The chart left shows the colour coordinates of the neutral formulation above, compared against the non-colour corrected magnetite dispersion and a comparative silver nano-particle ink. It can be seen that the yellow tint has been fairly well counteracted in comparison to the metal ink samples.

The patent goes on to discuss the importance of the media in achieving a metallic effect and that the pore size of the surface of the media must be smaller than that of the magnetite pigment particles to ensure they remain on the surface as a contiguous layer. Fig 1 below shows this schematically with the dyes (16) absorbing into the media under the ceramic particles (14). There is an obvious issue to such a configuration in that the robustness of the printed image will be compromised if the pigment is left unprotected on the surface, but this is addressed in the patent application US 2014/0170395 A1.

June-14bAlthough it seems that the ultimate specular reflectivity of this approach is not quite that of a metallic silver ink, there do seem to be significant advantages in using such benign and low cost iron oxide materials.